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Traffic Signal Modules and Pedestrian Modules

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The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of traffic signal modules and pedestrian modules since 2005. Traffic signal modules and pedestrian modules are installed at intersections to control vehicle and pedestrian traffic. Most are installed, operated, and maintained by municipalities. Some are installed and operated by federal and state governments, private companies or property owners. These signals typically operate 24 hours per day, so more efficient signal modules can result in significant energy savings.


Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information


Recent Updates

There are no recent updates for this equipment.


Standards for Traffic Signal Modules and Pedestrian Modules

The following content summarizes the energy conservation standards for traffic signal modules and pedestrian modules. The text is not an official reproduction of the Code of Federal Regulations and should not be used for legal research or citation.

Current Standard

For the purpose of this regulation, traffic signal modules and pedestrian modules are defined in the Code of Federal Regulations at 10 CFR 431.221. Traffic signal modules and pedestrian modules manufactured and distributed in commerce, as defined by 42 U.S.C. 6291(16), on or after January 1, 2006, must meet the energy conservation standards specified in the Code of Federal Regulations 10 CFR 431.226. This information is also in the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

Traffic signal modules and pedestrian modules shall be installed with compatible, electrically connected signal control interface devices and traffic control conflict monitoring systems, and shall now exceed the nominal wattage and maximum wattage indicated in the following table:

Table 1. Maximum Nominal Wattage1 and Maximum Wattages2
Traffic Signal Module Type:

12" Red Ball 17 11
8" Red Ball 13 8
12" Red Arrow 12 9
12" Green Ball 15 15
8" Green Ball 12 12
12" Green Arrow 11 11
Pedestrian Module Type:

Combination Walking Man/Hand 16 13
Walking Man 12 9
Orange Hand 16 13

1Nominal wattage is defined as power consumed by the module when it is operated within a chamber at a temperature of 25°C after the signal has been operated for 60 minutes.

2 Maximum wattage is the wattage at which power consumed by the module after being operated for 60 minutes while mounted in a temperature testing chamber so that the lensed portion of the module is outside the chamber, all portions of the module behind the lens are within the chamber at a temperature of 74 °C and the air temperature in front of the lens is maintained at a minimum of 49 °C.

For further guidance or to submit questions related to the implementation of this standard, visit the Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions page.

Test Procedure for Traffic Signal Modules and Pedestrian Modules

Current Test Procedure

To determine compliance with DOE standards, manufacturers must follow the test procedures specified at 10 CFR 431.224 for traffic signal modules and pedestrian modules manufactured or distributed into commerce on or after January 8, 2007. This information is also in the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

For further guidance or to submit questions related to the implementation of this test procedure, visit the Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions page.

Waivers, Exceptions, and Exemptions

Waivers

No test procedure waivers have been issued for traffic signal modules or pedestrian modules.

For information about obtaining test procedure waivers, see 10 CFR section 431 subpart V.

Exceptions

DOE's Office of Hearings and Appeals has not authorized exception relief for traffic signal modules or pedestrian modules.

For information about obtaining exception relief, see 10 CFR part 1003.

State Exemptions to Federal Preemption

DOE has not exempted any state from this energy conservation standard. States may petition DOE to exempt a state regulation from preemption by the federal energy conservation standard. States may also petition DOE to withdraw such exemptions. For details, see 10 CFR part 431, subpart W.

Statutory Authority

The current energy conservation standards for traffic signal modules and pedestrian modules are mandated by Part A, the "Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products Other Than Automobiles" of Title III of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), as amended. (42 U.S.C. 6291–6309) These appliances are treated as covered products under Part A. (42 U.S.C. 6291(37))

Historical Information

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 amended EPCA to mandate test procedures for traffic signal modules and pedestrian modules and to require traffic signal modules and pedestrian modules manufactured on or after January 1, 2006, to meet energy conservation standards.

Helpful Links and Contact Information

Helpful Links

Find tips and guidance for making your home, workplace, or vehicle more energy efficient visit EnergySaver.gov.

Contact information

For more information related to the regulation of this product, please email:


traffic_signal_and_pedestrian_modules@ee.doe.gov