•  


Small Electric Motors

Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products

Manufacturers will be required to comply with the Department of Energy’s (DOE) energy conservation standard for small electric motors beginning 2015. A small commercial or industrial electric motor converts electrical energy to rotating mechanical energy. When operating, the electrical energy is transferred as useful mechanical energy to some driven device such as a fan, pump, blower, compressor, or conveyor. Small electric motors include single phase and polyphase motors built in a two-digit National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) frame and are rated from ¼ to 3 horsepower.

The current standard will save approximately 2.6 quads of energy and result in approximately $35 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2015-2044. The standard will avoid about 133.6 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 26.2 million automobiles.

The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for Electric Motors Energy Conservation Standard.


Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information


Recent Updates

There are no recent updates for small electric motors.


Standards for Small Electric Motors

The following content summarizes energy conservation standards for small electric motors. The text is not an official reproduction of the Code of Federal Regulations and should not be used for legal research or citation.

Current Standard

Each small electric motors manufactured alone or as a component of another piece of non-covered equipment and distributed in commerce, as defined by 42 U.S.C. 6291 (16), after March 9, 2015 must have an average full load efficiency specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 431.446. Small electric motors which require listing or certification by a nationally recognized safety testing laboratory must comply after March 9, 2017. This information is also available in the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

Table 1. Energy Conservation Standards for Small Electric Motors

Table 1. Energy Conservation Standards for Small Electric Motors
Motor horsepower/standard kilowatt equivalent Average full load efficiency
Polyphase
Open motors (number of poles)

6 4 2




0.25/0.18 67.5 69.5 65.6
0.33/0.25 71.4 73.4 69.5
0.5/0.37 75.3 78.2 73.4
0.75/0.55 81.7 81.1 76.8
1/0.75 82.5 83.5 77.0
1.5/1.1 83.8 86.5 84.0
2/1.5 N/A 86.5 85.5
3/2.2 N/A 86.9 85.5
Motor horsepower/standard kilowatt equivalent Average full load efficiency
Capacitor-start capacitor-run and capacitor-start induction-run
Open motors (number of poles)
6 4 2
0.25/0.18 62.2 68.5 66.6
0.33/0.25 66.6 72.4 70.5
0.5/0.37 76.2 76.2 72.4
0.75/0.55 80.2 81.8 76.2
1/0.75 81.1 82.6 80.4
1.5/1.1 N/A 83.8 81.5
2/1.5 N/A 84.5 82.9
3/2.2 N/A N/A 84.1

For further guidance or to submit questions related to the implementation of this standard, visit the Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions page.

Test Procedure for Small Electric Motors

Current Test Procedure

The test procedures to measure the energy efficiency of small electric motors shall be the test procedures specified under 10 CFR 431.444 for small electric motors manufactured or distributed into commerce. Compliance with the applicable energy efficiency requirements for a small electric motor shall be determined according to 10 CFR 431.445. Also see Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

For further guidance or to submit questions related to the implementation of this test procedure, visit the Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions page.

Waivers, Exceptions, and Exemptions

Waivers

Test procedure waivers have not been issued for small electric motors.

For information about obtaining test procedure waivers, see 10 CFR 431, subpart V.

Exceptions

DOE's Office of Hearings and Appeals has not authorized exception relief for electric motors.

For information about obtaining exception relief, see 10 CFR part 1003.

State Exemptions to Federal Pre-emption

DOE has not exempted any states from this energy conservation standard. States may petition DOE to exempt a state regulation from preemption by the Federal energy conservation standard. States may also petition DOE to withdraw such exemptions. For details, see 10 CFR 431, subpart W.

The energy conservation standards for certain small electric motors are provided under Part A–1, "Certain Industrial Equipment" of Title III of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), as amended. (42 U.S.C. 6311–6317). Under EPCA, as amended, DOE is directed to prescribe energy conservation standards for those small electric motors for which standards are technologically feasible and economically justified, and would result in significant energy savings. (42 U.S.C. 6317).

Statutory Authority

Historical Information

Helpful Links and Contact Information

Helpful Links

Find tips and guidance for making your home, workplace, or vehicle more energy efficient visit EnergySavers.gov.

Contact information

For more information related to the regulation of this product, please email:


small_electric_motors@ee.doe.gov