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Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures

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The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of metal halide lamp fixtures since 2007. A metal halide lamp fixture uses a metal halide lamp and a metal halide lamp ballast. The lamp is the light source and the ballast starts and regulates current. Metal halide fixtures or lighting systems provide lighting for parking lots and streets, flood lighting, athletics facilities, big-box stores, and warehouses.

The standard mandatory in 2009 will save approximately 6.4 quads of energy and result in approximately $9.6 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2009-2038. The standard will avoid about 93.6 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions.

The standard mandatory in 2017 will save up to 0.49 quads of energy and result in up to $1.6 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2017-2046. The standard will avoid up to 27.8 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions.


Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information


Recent Updates

DOE published a final rule prescribing new energy conservation standards for metal halide lamp fixtures. 79 FR 7745 (February 10, 2014). For more information, please see the rulemaking page.


Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures

The following content summarizes the energy conservation standards for metal halide lamp fixtures. The text is not an official reproduction of the Code of Federal Regulations and should not be used for legal research or citation.

Current Standard

For the purpose of this regulation, metal halide lamp fixtures covered are defined in the Code of Federal Regulations at 10 CFR 431.322. These standards do not apply to:

  • Metal halide lamp fixtures with regulated lag ballasts;
  • Metal halide lamp fixtures that use electronic ballasts that operate at 480 volts; or
  • Metal halide lamp fixtures that are rated only for 150 watt lamps; are rated for use in wet locations as specified by the National Fire Protection Association in National Fire Protection Association 70; and contain a ballast that is rated to operate at ambient air temperatures above 50°C, as specified in Underwriters Laboratory 1029.

Metal halide lamp fixtures manufactured and distributed in commerce, as defined by 42 U.S.C. 6291(16), on or after January 1, 2009, must meet the energy conservation standards specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 431.326.

Lamps designed to be operated with lamps rated greater than or equal to 150 watts but less than or equal to 500 watts must contain:

  • a pulse-start metal halide ballast with a minimum ballast efficiency of 88%,
  • a magnetic probe-start ballast with a minimum ballast efficiency of 94%, or
  • a nonpulse-start electronic ballast with either a minimum ballast efficiency of 92% for wattages greater than 250 watts; or a minimum ballast efficiency of 90% for wattages less than or equal to 250 watts.

For further guidance or to submit questions related to the implementation of this standard, visit the Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions page.

Amended Standard

On February 10, 2014, amended standards were published for metal halide lamp fixtures. The full text of the amended standard is available in the Code of Federal Regulations at 10 CFR 431.326(c). On February 10, 2017, these amended standards will establish new energy conservation standards for metal halide lamp fixtures, as summarized in the tables below. These amended standards do not apply to:

  • Metal halide lamp fixtures with regulated lag ballasts;
  • Metal halide lamp fixtures that use electronic ballasts that operate at 480 volts; or
  • Metal halide lamp fixtures that use high-frequency electronic ballasts.

Except when the requirements of the standards mandatory in 2009 are more stringent (i.e., require a larger minimum efficiency value) or as provided in the exceptions below, each metal halide lamp fixture manufactured on or after February 10, 2017 must contain a metal halide ballast with an efficiency not less than the value determined from the appropriate equation in the following table:

Table 1. Amended Energy Conservation Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures

Designed to be Operated with Lamps of the Following Rated Lamp Wattage

Tested Input Voltage††

Minimum Ballast Efficiency Standard Equation† (%)

greater than equal to sign50 W and less than equal to sign100 W

Tested at 480 V

(1/(1+1.24× P^(-0.351))) – 0.0200

All others

1/(1+1.24×P^(-0.351))

>100 W and <150* W

Tested at 480 V

(1/(1+1.24×P^(-0.351))) – 0.0200

All others

1/(1+1.24×P^(-0.351))

greater than equal to sign150** W and less than equal to sign250 W

Tested at 480 V

0.880

All others

For greater than equal to sign150 W and less than equal to sign200 W: 0.880

For >200 W and less than equal to sign250 W:

1/(1+0.876×P^(-0.351))

>250 W and less than equal to sign500 W

Tested at 480 V

For >250 and <265 W: 0.880

For greater than equal to sign265 W and less than equal to sign500 W:

(1/(1+0.876×P^(-0.351)) – 0.010

All others

1/(1+0.876×P^(-0.351))

>500 W and less than equal to sign1000 W

Tested at 480 V

For >500 W and less than equal to sign750 W: 0.900

For >750 W and less than equal to sign1000 W: 0.000104×P+0.822

For >500 W and less than equal to sign1000 W: may not utilize a

probe-start ballast

All others

For >500 W and less than equal to sign750 W: 0.910

For >750 W and less than equal to sign1000 W: 0.000104×P+0.832

For >500 W and less than equal to sign1000 W: may not utilize a probe-start ballast

* Includes 150 W fixtures rated only for 150 W lamps; rated for use in wet locations, as specified by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70, section 410.4(A); and containing a ballast that is rated to operate at ambient air temperatures above 50 °C, as specified by UL 1029.

** Excludes 150 W fixtures rated only for 150 W lamps; rated for use in wet locations, as specified by the NFPA 70, section 410.4(A); and containing a ballast that is rated to operate at ambient air temperatures above 50 °C, as specified by UL 1029.

P is defined as the rated wattage of the lamp the fixture is designed to operate.

†† Tested input voltage is specified in 10 CFR 431.324.

After a regulatory action has been completed, Executive Order 12866 requires agencies to identify the substantive changes between the draft submitted to Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) for review and the action subsequently announced, and to identify those changes made at the suggestion or recommendation of OIRA.

Test Procedure for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures

Current Test Procedure

To determine compliance with DOE standards, manufacturers must follow the test procedures specified at 10 CFR 431.324) for metal halide lamp fixtures manufactured or distributed into commerce on or after October 21, 2012.

For further guidance or to submit questions related to the implementation of this test procedure, visit the Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions page.

Waivers, Exceptions, and Exemptions

Waivers

No test procedure waivers have been issued for metal halide lamp fixtures.

For information about obtaining test procedure waivers, see 10 CFR part 431 subpart V.

Exceptions

DOE's Office of Hearings and Appeals has not authorized exception relief for metal halide ballasts and fixtures.

For information about obtaining exception relief, see 10 CFR part 1003.

State Exemptions to Federal Pre-emption

DOE has not exempted any state from this energy conservation standard. States may petition DOE to exempt a state regulation from preemption by the Federal energy conservation standard. States may also petition DOE to withdraw such exemptions. For details, see 10 CFR part 431, subpart W.

Statutory Authority

The current energy conservation standards for metal halide lamp fixtures are mandated by Part A, the "Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products Other Than Automobiles" of Title III of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), as amended. (42 U.S.C. 6291–6309) These appliances are all treated as "covered products" under Part A. (42 U.S.C. 6291(2), (62), (63), and (64)))

Historical Information

EISA 2007 amended EPCA to prescribe energy conservation standards for metal halide lamp fixtures. DOE incorporated these standards into the Code of Federal Regulations on March 23, 2009 and adopted test procedures on March 9, 2010.

Helpful Links and Contact Information

Helpful Links

Find tips and guidance for making your home, workplace, or vehicle more energy efficient visit EnergySavers.gov.

Contact information

For more information related to the regulation of this product, please email:


metal_halide_lamp_fixtures@ee.doe.gov