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Residential Dishwashers

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Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for residential dishwashers since 1988. Residential dishwashers use water and detergent to wash and rinse dishware, glassware, eating utensils, and most cooking utensils. Some dishwashers also dry dishes.

Standards implemented in 1994 will save approximately 1.6 quads of energy and result in approximately $19.8 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1994-2023. The standard will avoid about 50.3 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 9.7 million automobiles.

Standards implemented in 2010 will save approximately 0.6 quads of energy and result in approximately $10.3 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2010-2034. The standard will avoid about 32.5 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 6.4 million automobiles.

Standards that become mandatory in 2013 will save approximately 0.07 quad of energy and result in approximately $2.9 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2013-2042. The standard will avoid about 4 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 784,000 automobiles.

The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Conventional Cooking Products Standby Mode and Off Mode Test Procedure.


Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information


Recent Updates

DOE published a  Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking and availability of the technical support document regarding energy conservation standards for residential dishwashers. 79 FR 76142  (December 19, 2014) For more information, please see the rulemaking page


Standards for Residential Dishwashers

The following content summarizes the energy conservation standards for residential dishwashers. The text is not an official reproduction of the Code of Federal Regulations and should not be used for legal research or citation.

Current Standard

Dishwashers manufactured and distributed in commerce, as defined by 42 U.S.C. 6291(16), must meet the energy conservation standards specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 430.32(f)(2). This information is also available in the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

Table 1. Energy Conservation Standards for Dishwashers Manufactured On or After January 1, 2010
Product Class Estimated Annual Energy Use (kWh/year) Water Consumption (gallons/cycle)
1. Standard (Capacity =8 place settings) 355 6.5
2. Compact (Capacity < 8 place settings) 260 4.5
Table 2. Energy Conservation Standards for Dishwashers Manufactured On or After May 30, 2013
Product Class Estimated Annual Energy Use (kWh/year) Water Consumption (gallons/cycle)
1. Standard (Capacity =8 place settings) 307 5.0
2. Compact (Capacity < 8 place settings) 222 3.5

For further guidance or to submit questions related to the implementation of this standard, visit the Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions page.

After a regulatory action has been completed, Executive Order 12866 requires agencies to identify the substantive changes between the draft submitted to Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) for review and the action subsequently announced, and to identify those changes made at the suggestion or recommendation of OIRA. The document below provides more information:

Test Procedure for Residential Dishwashers

Current Test Procedure

To determine compliance with  DOE standards, manufacturers must follow the test procedures specified at 10 CFR 430.23(c) for residential dishwashers as of September 29, 2003. The methods to conduct the test procedure are further specified in 10 CFR Part 430 Appendix C to Subpart B and Appendix C1 to Subpart B. These are also in the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

For further guidance or to submit questions related to the implementation of this test procedure, visit the Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions page.

Waivers, Exceptions, and Exemptions

Waivers

Test procedure waivers have been issued for residential dishwashers. The waivers specifically address units with water softeners and units which operate on 208 volt supply power, which are not covered under the current DOE test procedure. For more information on the waivers granted and those waiver petitions still pending final action, if any, please see waiver actions.

For information about obtaining test procedure waivers, see 10 CFR 430.27.

Exceptions

DOE's Office of Hearings and Appeals has not authorized exception relief for residential dishwashers.

For information about obtaining exception relief, see 10 CFR part 1003.

State Exemptions to Federal Preemption

DOE has not exempted any state from this energy conservation standard. States may petition DOE to exempt a state regulation from preemption by the Federal energy conservation standard. States may also petition DOE to withdraw such exemptions. For details, see CFR part 430, subpart D.

Small Business Exemptions

Any manufacturer of a covered product with annual gross revenues that do not exceed $8,000,000 from all its operations and meets certain other conditions may apply for an exemption to the energy conservation standard. For details, see CFR part 430, subpart E.

Statutory Authority

The current energy conservation standards for residential dishwashers are mandated by Part A, the "Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products Other Than Automobiles" of Title III of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), as amended. (42 U.S.C. 6291–6309) These appliances are treated as covered products under Part A. (42 U.S.C. 6292(a)(6))

Historical Information

EPCA prescribes energy conservation standards for various consumer products and commercial and industrial equipment. EPCA also requires DOE to determine whether amended, more stringent standards would be technologically feasible and economically justified, and would save a significant amount of energy. EISA 2007 subsequently prescribed standards for dishwashers. EISA 2007 also amended EPCA to direct DOE to amend its test procedure for dishwashers to include measures of standby mode and off mode energy consumption.

Previous Test Procedures

2001 Final Rule

1997 Final Rule

Helpful Links and Contact Information

Helpful Links

Find tips and guidance for making your home, workplace, or vehicle more energy efficient visit EnergySavers.gov.

DOE supports the testing and verification of ENERGY STAR® products in close collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency. ENERGY STAR qualified dishwashers are, on average, 10% more energy efficient and 12% more water efficient than standard models.

Contact information

For more information related to the regulation of this product, please email:


dishwashers@ee.doe.gov