•  


General Service Fluorescent Lamps

Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products

The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of general service fluorescent lamps (GSFLs) since 1994. GSFLs are fluorescent tubes with pins at one or both ends for installation. These lamps are generally installed in ceilings.


Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information


Recent Updates

DOE issued a pre-publication Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking regarding energy conservation standards for general service fluorescent and incandescent reflector lamps (April 11, 2014). For more information, please see the rulemaking webpage.


Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps

The following content summarizes the energy conservation standards for GSFLs. The text is not an official reproduction of the Code of Federal Regulations and should not be used for legal research or citation.

Current Standard

For the purpose of this regulation, standards pertain to following general service fluorescent lamps:

  1. Any straight-shaped lamp (commonly referred to as 4-foot medium bipin lamps) with medium bipin bases of nominal overall length of 48 inches and rated wattage of 25 or more;
  2. Any U-shaped lamp (commonly referred to as 2-foot U-shaped lamps) with medium bipin bases of nominal overall length between 22 and 25 inches and rated wattage of 25 or more;
  3. Any rapid start lamp (commonly referred to as 8-foot high output lamps) with recessed double contact bases of nominal overall length of 96 inches;
  4. Any instant start lamp (commonly referred to as 8-foot slimline lamps) with single pin bases of nominal overall length of 96 inches and rated wattage of 52 or more;
  5. Any straight-shaped lamp (commonly referred to as 4-foot miniature bipin standard output lamps) with miniature bipin bases of nominal overall length between 45 and 48 inches and rated wattage of 26 or more; and
  6. Any straight-shaped lamp (commonly referred to 4-foot miniature bipin high output lamps) with miniature bipin bases of nominal overall length between 45 and 48 inches and rated wattage of 49 or more.

General service fluorescent lamps manufactured and distributed in commerce, as defined by 42 U.S.C. 6291(16), must meet the energy conservation standards specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 430.32(n).

Each of the general service fluorescent lamps listed in the table below must meet or exceed the applicable listed lamp efficacy standards. This information is also in the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

Each of the following general service fluorescent lamps manufactured after July 14, 2012, shall meet or exceed the following lamp efficacy standards shown in the table.

Table 1. Energy Conservation Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps
Lamp type Correlated color temperature Minimum average lamp efficacy (lm/W)
4-foot medium bipin less than equal to sign 4,500K
> 4,500K and less than equal to sign 7,000K
89
88
2-foot U-shaped less than equal to sign 4,500K
> 4,500K and less than equal to sign 7,000K
84
81
8-foot slimline less than equal to sign 4,500K
> 4,500K and less than equal to sign 7,000K
97
93
8-foot high output less than equal to sign 4,500K
> 4,500K and less than equal to sign 7,000K
92
88
4-foot miniature bipin standard output less than equal to sign 4,500K
> 4,500K and less than equal to sign 7,000K
86
81
4-foot miniature bipin high output less than equal to sign 4,500K
> 4,500K and less than equal to sign 7,000K
76
72

For further guidance or to submit questions related to the implementation of this standard, visit the Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions page.

Test Procedure for General Service Fluorescent Lamps

Current Test Procedure

To determine compliance with DOE standards, manufacturers must follow the test procedures specified at 10 CFR 430.23(r) for general service fluorescent lamps manufactured or distributed into commerce. The methods to conduct the test procedure are further specified in 10 CFR 430, Subpart B, Appendix R. This information is also in the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

For further guidance or to submit questions related to the implementation of this test procedure, visit the Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions page.

Waivers, Exceptions, and Exemptions

Waivers

No test procedure waivers have been issued for general service fluorescent lamps.

For information about obtaining test procedure waivers, see 10 CFR 430.27.

Exceptions

DOE's Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) has authorized exception relief for general service fluorescent lamps.

Company Date OHA Case Number
Philips Lighting Company 04/16/2012 EXC-12-0001
GE Lighting 04/16/2012 EXC-12-0002
OSRAM SYLVANIA, Inc. 04/16/2012 EXC-12-0003
Ushio America, Inc. 06/21/2012 EXC-12-0004
Tailored Lighting, Inc 10/23/2012 EXC-12-0007
EiKO, Ltd. 11/16/2012 EXC-12-0013
Ascent Battery Supply, L.L.C. 11/16/2012 EXC-12-0012
Westinghouse Lighting Corporation 09/17/2012 EXC-12-0011
DLU Lighting USA 09/06/2012 EXC-12-0010
Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. 07/27/2012 EXC-12-0006
Satco Products, Inc. 07/20/2012 EXC-12-0009
Litetronics International, Inc. 07/20/2012 EXC-12-0008
Halco Lighting Technologies 07/10/2012 EXC-12-0005

For information about obtaining exception relief, see 10 CFR part 1003.

State Exemptions to Federal Pre-emption

DOE has not exempted any state from this energy conservation standard. States may petition DOE to exempt a state regulation from preemption by the Federal energy conservation standard. States may also petition DOE to withdraw such exemptions. For details, see 10 CFR part 430, subpart D.

Small Business Exemptions

Any manufacturer of a covered product with annual gross revenues that do not exceed $8,000,000 from all its operations and meets certain other conditions may apply for an exemption to the energy conservation standard. For details, see 10 CFR part 430, subpart E.

Statutory Authority

The current energy conservation standards for GSFLs are mandated by Part A, the "Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products Other Than Automobiles" of Title III of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), as amended. (42 U.S.C. 6291–6309) These appliances are treated as covered products under Part A. (42 U.S.C. 6292(a)(14))

Historical Information

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 amended EPCA to establish energy conservation standards for certain types of fluorescent lamps. DOE published a final rule in July 2009 amending standards for covered general service fluorescent lamps. DOE published a final rule in May 1997 revising test procedures for general service fluorescent lamps established by an interim final rule in 1994.

Test Procedures

2009 Final Rule

1997 Final Rule

Helpful Links and Contact Information

Helpful Links

Find tips and guidance for making your home, workplace, or vehicle more energy efficient visit EnergySavers.gov.

Contact information

For more information related to the regulation of this product, please email:


general_service_fluorescent_lamps@ee.doe.gov