•  


Computer Room Air Conditioners

Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products

The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of computer room air conditioners (CRACs) since 2012. A CRAC is a device that monitors and maintains the temperature, air distribution, and humidity in a network room or data center and is rated as a computer room air conditioner in accordance with 10 CFR 431.96.


Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information


Recent Updates

There are no recent updates for this product.


Standards for Computer Room Air Conditioners

The following content summarizes the energy conservation standards for CRACs. The text is not an official reproduction of the Code of Federal Regulations and should not be used for legal research or citation.

Current Standard

Computer room air conditioners manufactured and distributed in commerce, as defined by 42 U.S.C. 6291 (16), on or after the compliance dates specified in the table below must meet the energy conservation standards specified 10 CFR 431.97(e) in the final rule published on May 16, 2012. (77 FR 28928; 28994-5). This information is also available in the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

Table 1. Energy Conservation Standards for Computer Room Air Conditioners
Product Net Sensible Cooling Capacity Efficiency Level Compliance Date
Downflow Unit Upflow Unit
Computer Room Air Conditioners, Air-cooled < 65,000 Btu/h SCOP = 2.20 SCOP = 2.09 10/29/2012
>=65,000 Btu/h and < 240,000 Btu/h SCOP = 2.10 SCOP = 1.99 10/29/2013
>= 240,000 Btu/h and < 760,000 Btu/h SCOP = 1.90 SCOP = 1.79 10/29/2013
Computer Room Air Conditioners, Water-cooled < 65,000 Btu/h SCOP = 2.60 SCOP = 2.49 10/29/2012
>=65,000 Btu/h and < 240,000 Btu/h SCOP = 2.50 SCOP = 2.39 10/29/2013
>= 240,000 Btu/h and < 760,000 Btu/h SCOP = 2.40 SCOP = 2.29 10/29/2013
Computer Room Air Conditioners, Water-cooled with a Fluid Economizer < 65,000 Btu/h SCOP = 2.55 SCOP = 2.44 10/29/2012
>=65,000 Btu/h and < 240,000 Btu/h SCOP = 2.45 SCOP = 2.34 10/29/2013
>= 240,000 Btu/h and < 760,000 Btu/h SCOP = 2.35 SCOP = 2.24 10/29/2013
Computer Room Air Conditioners, Glycol-cooled < 65,000 Btu/h SCOP = 2.50 SCOP = 2.39 10/29/2012
>=65,000 Btu/h and < 240,000 Btu/h SCOP = 2.15 SCOP = 2.04 10/29/2013
>= 240,000 Btu/h and < 760,000 Btu/h SCOP = 2.10 SCOP = 1.99 10/29/2013
Computer Room Air Conditioners, Glycol-cooled with a Fluid Economizer < 65,000 Btu/h SCOP = 2.40 SCOP = 2.34 10/29/2012
>=65,000 Btu/h and < 240,000 Btu/h SCOP = 2.10 SCOP = 1.99 10/29/2013
>= 240,000 Btu/h and < 760,000 Btu/h SCOP = 2.05 SCOP = 1.94 10/29/2013

For further guidance or to submit questions related to the implementation of this standard, visit the Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions page.

Test Procedure for Computer Room Air Conditioners

Current Test Procedure

To determine compliance DOE standards, manufacturers must follow the test procedures specified at 10 CFR 431.96 and published in the May 16, 2012 final rule (77 FR 28928; 28989-90). These are also in the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

For further guidance or to submit questions related to the implementation of this test procedure, visit the Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions page.

Waivers, Exceptions, and Exemptions

Waivers

Test procedure waivers have not been issued for CRACs.

For information about obtaining test procedure waivers, see 10 CFR 431 subpart V.

Exceptions

DOE’s Office of Hearings and Appeals has not authorized exception relief for CRACs. For information about obtaining exception relief, see 10 CFR part 1003.

State Exemptions to Federal Pre-emption

DOE has not exempted any state from this energy conservation standard. States may petition DOE to exempt a state regulation from preemption by the Federal energy conservation standard. States may also petition DOE to withdraw such exemptions. For details, see 10 CFR part 431 subpart W.

Statutory Authority

The current energy conservation standards for CRACs are mandated by Part A–1, the "Certain Industrial Equipment" of Title III of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), as amended. (42 U.S.C. 6311–6317). This equipment is treated as covered equipment under Part A-1. (42 U.S.C. 6311(1)(B),(C),and (D))

Historical Information

Until the adoption of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010, DOE had determined that it did not have the authority to regulate CRACs. 65 FR 48831, 48831 (Aug. 9, 2000); 69 FR 61962, 61967 (Oct. 21, 2004).

ASHRAE Standard 90.1–2010 has a broader scope as compared to previous versions of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, including process loads (e.g., computer rooms). It created separate product classes and minimum efficiency levels for “air conditioners and condensing units serving computer rooms” as well. EPCA generally directs DOE to follow ASHRAE Standard 90.1 when it is amended with respect to certain equipment types, including commercial package air conditioning and heating equipment. Thus, DOE concluded that because ASHRAE has expanded the scope of Standard 90.1 to include air conditioners and condensing units serving computer rooms, DOE should now regulate the energy use of these products.

DOE began the process to review the ASHRAE 90.1-2011 efficiency levels in a May 2011 NODA. 76 FR 25622, 25634 (May 5, 2011). DOE proposed efficiency levels and test procedures consistent with those in 90.1-2010 in a January 2012 notice of public rulemaking. 77 FR 2356, 2371-2372 (Jan. 17, 2012). DOE adopted the proposed levels in a May 2012 final rule. 77 FR 28928, 28930-28931 (May 16, 2012).

Helpful Links and Contact Information

Helpful Links

Find tips and guidance for making your home, workplace, or vehicle more energy efficient visit EnergySavers.gov.

Contact information

For more information related to the regulation of this product, please email:


computer_room_air_conditioners@ee.doe.gov