FY 2004 Financial Awards

In 2004, DOE awarded funding to a number of science and research projects to support research, development, and demonstration of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.

The Grand Challenge Hydrogen Storage "Centers of Excellence"

This award establishes three "Centers of Excellence" for exploratory research in hydrogen storage—at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. In addition to the DOE national laboratory lead, each center includes several university and industry partners. Responding to DOE's "Grand Challenge" solicitation, these centers will address the major technical barrier to on-board hydrogen storage - storing enough hydrogen to enable greater than 300 mile driving range without impacting cargo or passenger space. In addition, individual universities, research institutes, and small businesses will explore new materials for hydrogen storage. The DOE share for this National Hydrogen Storage Project is $150 million over 5 years with an additional private cost share of approximately $20 million. For more information about this award, see:

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Vehicle and Infrastructure "Learning" Demonstrations

This award funds five "learning demonstrations" that will provide important data to focus research efforts. The use of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and the development of fuel-cell vehicles will require extensive research and an implementation strategy. Automakers and energy companies will work together with their teams under this project to demonstrate integrated and complete system solutions operating in real world environments. These demonstrations will assess the research program's progress toward achieving a technology readiness milestone by 2015. The expected DOE share is $190 million over 5 years with an additional private cost share of approximately $190 million. For more information about this award, see:

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Portable Power, Auxiliary Power Units, and R&D for Off-Road Fuel Cell Applications

This award funds fuel cell research projects that address critical cost and durability issues for consumer electronics, portable power, and auxiliary power unit fuel cell systems. Innovative research and development for off-road fuel cell applications are also funded as part of this award. The DOE share is $13 million dollars over 3 years with an additional private cost share of approximately $10 million. These selections are in addition to the $75 million in fuel cell awards announced in 2003. For more information about this award, see:

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Hydrogen Technology Learning Centers

In March 2004, DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office, in partnership with the State Technology Advancement Collaborative (STAC), awarded funding for the development and operation of hydrogen technology learning centers to educate students; potential end-users, such as fleets or building developers; local officials; and the public about the vision of a hydrogen economy. The learning centers are all located at universities, colleges, or other educational institutions. For details, see:

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Hydrogen Education

Hydrogen technology education projects include middle school and high school curricula and teacher professional development. These projects pair hydrogen technology experts with professional educators and experienced curriculum developers to create hands-on activities and lessons to engage students in the developing hydrogen economy. Teacher professional development is an essential component, as teachers nationwide will not only learn how to use the materials but also receive the training they need to build their expertise and enhance their ability to educate students. The hydrogen education projects also include the development of materials suitable for a general audience. These materials will help introduce the public to the hydrogen vision, as well as provide a better understanding of how fuel cells work; how hydrogen is produced, delivered, and stored; and the facts about hydrogen safety. For more information about this award, see:

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