HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Video (Text Alternative)

The presentation, HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage, contains three video files. The videos are described here.

Video #1: chemochromic hydrogen sensing membrane

This short video is intended to show how a chemochromic hydrogen sensing membrane impregnated with PdO doped titania pigments functions as a part of a high throughput combinatorial screening device. The video depicts a simple setup comprising an upside down acrylic pill box to the open end of which has been covered with a special filter paper. The surface of filter paper has been covered with a film of PdO on TiO2 pigments. A hypodermic needle has been inserted into the pill box right above the membrane and through which hydrogen gas flows into the pill box, passing through the membrane and exiting into the fume hood. Video shows the development of the color on membrane as the hydrogen is passed over and through it. In matter of few minutes, membrane color changes from beige to grayish black, irreversibly, indicating the extent of hydrogen present.

Video #2: chemochromic hydrogen sensing material

This short video is intended to show how FSEC's newly developed fast-acting chemochromic hydrogen sensing material that contains a proprietary pigment functions when exposed to flow of hydrogen. The video shows hydrogen flowing out a capillary tube at the bottom of the frame. A small piece of special filter paper about one inch by one inch covered with FSEC's hydrogen sensing pigment is held by tweezers and brought into the vicinity of hydrogen flowing out of the capillary tube. Within matter of few seconds the paper's white color turns deep blue indicating the extent of hydrogen present.

Video #3: chemochromic hydrogen sensing pigment

This short video is intended to show how FSEC developed fast-acting chemochromic hydrogen sensing pigment deposited on the surface of a glass microscope slide functions when exposed to hydrogen. The video shows hydrogen flowing out the tip of a narrow needle and impinging on to the surface of pigment covered glass microscope slide. The pigment color changes in matter of seconds from white to deep blue as long as hydrogen flow onto the slide is maintained. When needle is moved away from the slide causing hydrogen contact with the pigment to cease, the pigment color reverts back to the original bleached color in matter of few seconds.