DOE Launches Save Energy Now LEADER Program with 32 Companies

December 2, 2009

DOE has joined forces with 32 industrial companies to launch the Save Energy Now LEADER Program, which will provide technical assistance and resources to companies that pledge significant improvements in industrial energy efficiency. The 32 charter member companies from a broad spectrum of the U.S. industrial sector signed a voluntary pledge on December 2 to reduce their industrial energy intensity by 25% over the next decade. The industrial sector accounts for more than 18 million jobs in the United States, but it also consumes nearly 30% of the energy used nationwide and produces 27% of the country's carbon emissions.

The charter member companies agreed to establish energy use and energy intensity baselines and develop an energy management plan over the next 12 months. As indicated by the special "LEADER" designation, these companies are more than just first actors on the path to greater energy efficiency; they are serving as role models on an ongoing basis for others in the industrial sector. In return, the companies will receive access to select DOE resources, as well as national recognition for their energy management achievements. The companies signing the pledge include such industry heavyweights as 3M, AT&T, Bridgestone, Dow Chemical Company, Honeywell, Intel, Mohawk Industries, and Sherwin-Williams. For a complete list, see the DOE press release.

The LEADER program is a new component of the existing and successful Save Energy Now initiative, through which companies partner with DOE to conduct energy audits and assessments that identify the opportunities for energy and cost savings in the companies' operations. Participating businesses also have access to the tools and training they need to implement those recommendations. Since 2006, more than 2,000 plants received energy assessments through Save Energy Now, identifying opportunities for $1.3 billion in cost savings, 119 trillion Btu of natural gas savings, and carbon dioxide reductions totaling 11.2 million metric tons. See the Save Energy Now Web site.