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First Wind-Integrated High-Rise Under Construction in Bahrain

April 11, 2007


Photo of two partially-constructed sail-shaped buildings connected with three large metal girders on which wind turbines are installed.

Three wind turbines have been installed on the Bahrain World Trade Center, which is nearing completion.
Credit: Atkins

The world's first integration of utility-scale wind turbines into a building has been completed in Bahrain. Atkins, a leading provider of technology-based consultancy and support services, announced in late March that it has installed large wind turbines onto three 50-ton bridges that span the two towers of the Bahrain World Trade Center. The 50-story structure, under construction in Manama, Bahrain, is designed to channel the wind between the two towers and past the blades of the three wind turbines, which are 29 meters in diameter. According to Atkins, the wind turbines will supply up to 15 percent of the energy needs for the two towers. See the Atkins press release, and for an illustration of the completed building, see the Bahrain World Trade Center Web site.

A European study published in 2005 examined the potential for such building-integrated wind turbines in the United Kingdom. The study recommended further research on the wind regime in urban areas and around isolated buildings; the structural and noise implications of mounting wind turbines onto a building; and the optimal design for building-integrated wind turbines. The report also reviewed the experience with building-integrated wind turbines. At the time of that report, the largest such project involved the installation of three 5-meter wind turbines on the roof of a building. In contrast, the wind turbines in the Bahrain World Trade Center are fully integrated into the design of the buildings. See the 118-page U.K. report (PDF 4 MB). Download Adobe Reader.

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Content Last Updated: 09/21/2011