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Residential Dehumidifiers

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The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of residential dehumidifiers since 2007. Residential dehumidifiers reduce the level of humidity—the amount of water vapor—in the air.

The standard mandatory in 2007 will save approximately 0.27 quads of energy and result in approximately $3.14 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2007-2031. The standard will avoid about 14.1 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 2.8 million automobiles.

The standard mandatory in 2012 will save approximately 0.3 quads of energy and result in approximately $4.7 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2012-2036. The standard will avoid about 15.6 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 3.1 million automobiles.


Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information


Recent Updates

DOE published a final rule regarding the compliance date for the dehumidifier test procedure. 79 FR 7366 (February 7, 2014). For more information, please see the rulemaking webpage.

DOE published a final rule for test procedures for dehumidifiers, dishwashers, and conventional cooking products. 77 FR 65942 (Oct. 31, 2012). For more information, see the rulemaking webpage

DOE published a notice of public meeting and availability of a framework document for energy conservation standards for dehumidifiers.77 FR 49739 (Aug. 17, 2012).


Standards for Residential Dehumidifiers

The following content summarizes the energy factor requirements for residential dehumidifiers. The text is not an official reproduction of the Code of Federal Regulations and should not be used for legal research or citation.

Current Standard

Residential dehumidifiers manufactured and distributed in commerce, as defined by 42 U.S.C. 6291 (16), must have the minimum energy factor specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 430.32(v). This information is also available in the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

Table 1. Amended Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dehumidifiers
Manufactured On or After October 1, 2012
Product Capacity
(pints/day)
Minimum energy factor
(liters/kWh)
Up to 35.00 1.35
35.01—45.00 1.50
45.01—54.00 1.60
54.01—75.00 1.70
75.00 or more 2.50

For further guidance or to submit questions related to the implementation of this standard, visit the Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions page.

Test Procedure for Residential Dehumidifiers

Current Test Procedure

To determine compliance with DOE standards, manufacturers must follow the test procedures specified at 10 CFR 430.23(z) for residential dehumidifiers as of January 8, 2007. The methods to conduct the test procedure to comply with current standards are further specified in 10 CFR Part 430 Appendix X to Subpart B. Manufacturers will be required to conduct the test procedure specified in Appendix X1 to Subpart B at the time that new standards are implemented. These test procedures are also in the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

For further guidance or to submit questions related to the implementation of this test procedure, visit the Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions page.

Waivers, Exceptions, and Exemptions

Waivers

Test procedure waivers have not been issued for residential dehumidifiers.

For information about obtaining test procedure waivers, see 10 CFR 430.27.

Exceptions

DOE's Office of Hearings and Appeals has not authorized exception relief for residential dehumidifiers.

For information about obtaining exception relief, see 10 CFR part 1003.

State Exemptions to Federal Pre-emption

DOE has not exempted any state from this energy conservation standard. States may petition DOE to exempt a state regulation from preemption by the Federal energy conservation standard. States may also petition DOE to withdraw such exemptions. For details, see 10 CFR part 430, subpart D.

Small Business Exemptions

Any manufacturer of a covered product with annual gross revenues that do not exceed $8,000,000 from all its operations and meets certain other conditions may apply for an exemption to the energy conservation standard. For details, see 10 CFR part 430, subpart E.

Statutory Authority

The current energy conservation standards for dehumidifiers are mandated by Part A, the "Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products Other Than Automobiles" of Title III of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), as amended. (42 U.S.C. § 6291–6309) Dehumidifiers are covered products under Part A. (42 U.S.C. 6295(cc))

Historical Information

EPCA as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005), prescribes energy conservation standards for various consumer products and commercial and industrial equipment. EPCA also requires DOE to determine whether amended, more stringent, standards would be technologically feasible and economically justified, and would save a significant amount of energy. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007) subsequently prescribed standards for dehumidifiers, and DOE codified the statutory standards. EISA 2007 also amended EPCA to direct DOE to amend its test procedure for dehumidifiers to include measures of standby mode and off mode energy consumption. DOE published a test procedure final rule on October 31, 2012.

Helpful Links and Contact Information

Helpful Links

Find tips and guidance for making your home, workplace, or vehicle more energy efficient visit EnergySavers.gov.

DOE supports the testing and verification of ENERGY STAR® products in close collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency. ENERGY STAR qualified dehumidifiers use about 15% less energy than a conventional unit.

Contact information

For more information related to the regulation of this product, please email:


dehumidifiers@ee.doe.gov