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General Service Incandescent Lamps

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Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy’s (DOE) energy conservation standards for general service incandescent lamps (GSILs) since 2012. Most GSILs are the pear-shaped, screw-in light bulbs found in most homes. Most GSILs are currently sold as one of four wattages: 40, 60, 75, and 100. Starting in 2012, these will be replaced by more efficient lower wattage lamps.


Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information


Recent Updates

DOE published a final rule updating the test procedures for GSILs. 77 FR 4203 (Jan. 27, 2012).


Standards for General Service Incandescent Lamps

The following content summarizes the energy conservation standards for GSILs. The text is not an official reproduction of the Code of Federal Regulations and should not be used for legal research or citation.

Current Standard

For the purposes of this regulation a general service incandescent lamp is a standard incandescent or halogen incandescent lamp that is intended for general service applications; has a medium screw base; has a lumen range of 310 to 2,600 lumens; and is capable of being operated at a voltage range within 110 and 130 volts. A list of incandescent lamp types that are specifically excluded and are therefore, not subject to the regulation, can be found in 10 CFR 430.2. Information on an additional five lamp types excluded from this regulation is also available.

Standard-spectrum general service incandescent lamps manufactured and distributed in commerce, as defined by 42 U.S.C. 6291(16), must meet the energy conservation standards specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 430.32(x)(1). They shall have a color rendering index (CRI) greater than or equal to 80 and shall have rated maximum wattage, minimum lifetime, and compliance date as shown in the table below. This information is also in the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

Table 1. Energy Conservation Standards for Standard-Spectrum General Service Incandescent Lamp Standards
Rated lumen ranges Maximum rated wattage Minimum rated lifetime Effective date
1490-2600 72 1,000 hours 1/1/2012
1050-1489 53 1,000 hours 1/1/2013
750-1049 43 1,000 hours 1/1/2014
310-749 29 1,000 hours 1/1/2014

Modified-spectrum general service incandescent lamps manufactured and distributed in commerce, as defined by 42 U.S.C. 6291 (16), must meet the energy conservation standards specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 430.32(x)(1). They shall have a color rendering index (CRI) greater than or equal to 75 and shall have rated maximum wattage, minimum lifetime, and compliance date as shown in the table below.

Table 2. Energy Conservation Standards for Modified-Spectrum General Service Incandescent Lamp Standards
Rated lumen ranges Maximum rated wattage Minimum rated lifetime Effective date
1118-1950 72 1,000 hours 1/1/2012
788-1117 53 1,000 hours 1/1/2013
563-787 43 1,000 hours 1/1/2014
232-562 29 1,000 hours 1/1/2014

For further guidance or to submit questions related to the implementation of this standard, visit the Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions page.

Test Procedure for General Service Incandescent Lamps

Current Test Procedure

To determine compliance with DOE standards, manufacturers must follow the test procedures specified at 10 CFR 430.23(r) for general service incandescent lamps manufactured or distributed into commerce. The methods to conduct the test procedure are further specified in 10 CFR 430, Subpart B, Appendix R. This information is also in the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

For further guidance or to submit questions related to the implementation of this test procedure, visit the Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions page.

Waivers, Exceptions, and Exemptions

Waivers

No test procedure waivers have been issued for general service incandescent lamps.

For information about obtaining test procedure waivers, see 10 CFR 430.27.

Exceptions

DOE's Office of Hearings and Appeals has not authorized exception relief for general service incandescent lamps.

For information about obtaining exception relief, see 10 CFR part 1003.

State Exemptions to Federal Pre-emption

DOE has not exempted any state from this energy conservation standard. States may petition DOE to exempt a state regulation from preemption by the Federal energy conservation standard. States may also petition DOE to withdraw such exemptions. For details, see 10 CFR part 430, subpart D.

Small Business Exemptions

Any manufacturer of a covered product with annual gross revenues that do not exceed $8,000,000 from all its operations and meets certain other conditions may apply for an exemption to the energy conservation standard. For details, see 10 CFR part 430, subpart E.

Statutory Authority

The current energy conservation standards for GSILs are mandated by Part A, the "Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products Other Than Automobiles" of Title III of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), as amended. (42 U.S.C. 6291–6309) These appliances are treated as covered products under Part A. (42 U.S.C. 6291(30)(D))

Historical Information

EISA 2007 amended EPCA to establish energy conservation standards for general service incandescent lamps. In March 2009 DOE published a technical amendment that placed the energy conservation standards for general service incandescent lamps as prescribed in EISA 2007 in the Code of Federal Regulations.

AAs required by EISA 2007, DOE shall initiate another cycle of rulemaking in 2014 to consider a broader standard for "general service lamps," which includes GSILs, compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), general service light-emitting diode (LED) lamps, organic LED (OLED) lamps, and any other lamps determined to satisfy lighting applications traditionally served by GSIL. However, the definition of general service lamp does not apply to any lighting application or bulb shape excluded from the "general service incandescent lamp" definition, or any general service fluorescent lamp or incandescent reflector lamp.

Test Procedures

2009 Final Rule

1997 Final Rule

Helpful Links and Contact Information

Helpful Links

Find tips and guidance for making your home, workplace, or vehicle more energy efficient visit EnergySavers.gov.

DOE supports the testing and verification of ENERGY STAR® products in close collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency. ENERGY STAR qualified light bulbs use about 75% less energy than traditional incandescent bulbs.

Contact information

For more information related to the regulation of this product, please email:


general_service_incandescent_lamps@ee.doe.gov